SOAR+® Approved

cropped-Captain-Major-Web-Image-1080x300Patrick S. Major, medical In is pleased to announce that SOAR+® is an officially and finally Registered Trademark. Sextant Readings Solutions works closely with Patrick S. Major Inc. in supporting aviation safety management globally.

When using term SOAR+, Soar+, or otherwise referencing Patrick S. Major, Inc.’s proprietary safety of operations audit and resolution of safety issues process, and/or its flight data monitoring (FDM)-based safety of operations assessment, risk management, airmanship enhancement, and asset protection processes, kindly depict as follows “SOAR+®,” with the ® prominently displayed.

SOAR+, a practical, results-oriented, approach to the art and best-practice of aviation, represents the foundational underpinning for next generation safety management systems (SMS).

Paramount Signs Flight Dispatch Contract With AAR Airlift Group

Paramount Signs Flight Dispatch Contract With AAR Airlift Group

Contact: Nicole Buzynski Nicole.buzymski@paramountarg.com +1-540-737-4600

Paramount to provide dispatch and flight support for AAR Airlift’s global fleet.

Fredericksburg, Virginia – March 5, 2014 –Paramount Global Ferry & Flight Support, a division of Paramount Aviation Resources Group , a global provider of flight crew personnel and aircraft ferry and flight support services, has signed a contract with AAR Airlift Group to provide dispatch and flight support services to AAR’s fleet.

“We are excited to support AAR. We recognize that AAR has a global operation with a diverse fleet of aircraft that provide essential support to both civilian and military operations. Reliability is critical. Our global dispatch and flight services are a perfect match to provide the services to ensure that AAR Airlift’s crews have the information and support needed to safely complete each flight,” said Rick Wolfer, Paramount Global Ferry and Flight Support Division President.

“We are very pleased with the excellent service Paramount has provided AAR and look forward to their continued support for our future missions, ” said Jeffrey Wehrenberg, Chief Operating Officer, AAR Airlift Group. “AAR provides critical airlift support to government and military operations and has an impeccable safety record. We are confident that Paramount’s expertise and support will help us to maintain that record.”

Paramount Global Ferry and Flight Support has provided aircraft ferry and flight support services to aircraft operators throughout the world since 2008. In that time, Paramount has safely moved and supported hundreds of aircraft, including ATR, Airbus, Beechcraft, Boeing, Bombardier, Dassault Aviation, Dornier, EADS CASA, Fokker, and many other types of aircraft to destinations throughout the world.

“Safety is Paramount in aviation. It’s no coincidence we integrated the word Paramount into our corporate name because it is how we operate,” said Michael W. Johnson, Paramount Aviation Resources Group President and CEO. “Our team works closely with each customer to ensure the crews have the information and support they need to safely and efficiently complete every flight.”

Paramount provides dispatch and flight support and aircraft ferry services throughout the world for any aircraft type. With an in-house global flight dispatch center, Paramount maintains direct contact with crews continuously regardless of their location.

About Paramount Global Ferry and Flight Support

Paramount Global Ferry and Flight Support is a division of Paramount Aviation Resources Group. Founded in 2007, Paramount Aviation Resources Group is quickly becoming the most-trusted provider of leased flight crew personnel and aircraft ferry services in the world. With a commitment to aviation safety, reducing operating costs, and providing impeccable service, Paramount Aviation Resources Group is helping air operators achieve long-term viability. Paramount Aviation Resources Group was formed by airline professionals with thousands of flight hours and decades of experience as line pilots, instructors, and managers at international Part 121 air carriers. Visit Paramount Aviation Resources Group on the web at www.paramountarg.com

 

About AAR Airlift Group

AAR Airlift Group provides expeditionary airlift services in support of contingency operations worldwide. The Company is based in Melbourne, FL, and operates a fleet of fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft transporting personnel, supplies, and mail for the U.S. Department of Defense in Afghanistan and the Western Pacific. Visit AAR Airlift Group on the web at www.aarcorp.com/gov/airlift

 

FAA Issues EMS Rule, Includes Additional Helicopter Operations

Source: Rotor News, Helicopter Association International (HAI) Feb 21 2014

 

FAA Issues EMS Rule, Includes Additional Helicopter Operations

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has finalized a rule requiring stronger safety measures for helicopter operators, including air ambulances. Changes include equipment, training and operational requirements, and all HAI members are strongly encouraged to review the rule.

The rule is primarily directed toward air ambulance operations, but also addresses commercial helicopter and general aviation helicopter operations, implementing new operational procedures and additional equipment requirements. Additionally, the rule revises requirements for equipment, pilot testing, and alternative airports as well as increasing weather minimums for all general aviation helicopter operations under Part 91 in Class G airspace.

For helicopter air ambulances, the rule requires operations with medical personnel on board to be conducted under Part 135 operating rules and introduces new weather minimums and visibility requirements for Part 135 operations. It mandates flight planning, preflight risk analyses, safety briefings for medical personnel, and the establishment of operations control centers (OCC) for certain operators to help with risk management and flight monitoring. The rule also includes provisions to encourage instrument flight rules (IFR) operations. It requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with both helicopter terrain awareness and warning systems. In addition, helicopter air ambulance pilots will be required to hold instrument ratings.

For all helicopters operated under Part 135, these rules require that operators carry more survival equipment for operations over water. Alternate airports named in flight plans must have higher weather minimums than are currently required. These helicopters must be equipped with radio altimeters and pilots must be able to demonstrate that they can maneuver the aircraft during an inadvertent encounter with instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) to get out of those conditions safely. As mentioned above, the rule assigns new weather minimums to part 91 helicopter operations in Class G airspace.

The following represents a summary of affected entities:

Part 135 All Rotorcraft Operators:
Requires each rotorcraft to be equipped with a radio altimeter ( Section 135.160)
Adds Section 135.168 equipment requirements for rotorcraft operated over water. Helicopter operations conducted over water will be required to carry additional safety equipment to assist passengers and crew in the event an accident occurs over water.

Revised alternate airport weather minimums for rotorcraft in Section 135.221. This rule improves the likelihood of being able to land at the alternate airport if weather conditions in the area deteriorate while the helicopter is en route.

Revises Section 135.293 to require pilot testing of rotorcraft handling in flat-light, whiteout, and brownout conditions and demonstration of competency in recovery from an IIMC.

Part 135 Helicopter Air Ambulance:
Requires helicopter air ambulance flights with medical personnel on board to be conducted under Part 135 (Section 135.1, 135.601).

Requires certificate holders with 10 or more helicopter air ambulances to establish operations control centers (OCC) (Section 135.619) and requires drug and alcohol testing for operations control specialists (Section 120.105 and 120.215).

Requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with HTAWS (Section 135.605).

Requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with a flight data monitoring system (Section 135.607).

Requires each helicopter air ambulance operator to establish and document, in its operations manual, an FAA-approved preflight risk analysis (Section 135.617).

Requires pilots to identify and document the highest obstacle along the planned route (Section 135.615).

Requires safety briefings or training for helicopter air ambulance medical personnel (Section 135.621).

Establishes visual flight rules (VFR) weather minimums for helicopter air ambulance operations (Section 135.609).

Permits instrument flight rules (IFR) operations at airports without weather reporting (Section 135.611).

Establishes procedures for transitioning between IFR and VFR on approach to, and departure from, heliports or landing areas (Section 135.613).

Requires pilots in commend to hold an instrument rating (Section 135.603).

The rule is primarily directed toward air ambulance operations, but also addresses commercial helicopter and general aviation helicopter operations, implementing new operational procedures and additional equipment requirements. Additionally, the rule revises requirements for equipment, pilot testing, and alternative airports as well as increasing weather minimums for all general aviation helicopter operations under Part 91 in Class G airspace.

For helicopter air ambulances, the rule requires operations with medical personnel on board to be conducted under Part 135 operating rules and introduces new weather minimums and visibility requirements for Part 135 operations. It mandates flight planning, preflight risk analyses, safety briefings for medical personnel, and the establishment of operations control centers (OCC) for certain operators to help with risk management and flight monitoring. The rule also includes provisions to encourage instrument flight rules (IFR) operations. It requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with both helicopter terrain awareness and warning systems. In addition, helicopter air ambulance pilots will be required to hold instrument ratings.

For all helicopters operated under Part 135, these rules require that operators carry more survival equipment for operations over water. Alternate airports named in flight plans must have higher weather minimums than are currently required. These helicopters must be equipped with radio altimeters and pilots must be able to demonstrate that they can maneuver the aircraft during an inadvertent encounter with instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) to get out of those conditions safely. As mentioned above, the rule assigns new weather minimums to part 91 helicopter operations in Class G airspace.

The following represents a summary of affected entities:

  • Part 135 All Rotorcraft Operators:
    Requires each rotorcraft to be equipped with a radio altimeter ( Section 135.160)
    Adds Section 135.168 equipment requirements for rotorcraft operated over water. Helicopter operations conducted over water will be required to carry additional safety equipment to assist passengers and crew in the event an accident occurs over water.
  • Revised alternate airport weather minimums for rotorcraft in Section 135.221. This rule improves the likelihood of being able to land at the alternate airport if weather conditions in the area deteriorate while the helicopter is en route.
  • Revises Section 135.293 to require pilot testing of rotorcraft handling in flat-light, whiteout, and brownout conditions and demonstration of competency in recovery from an IIMC.
  • Part 135 Helicopter Air Ambulance:
    Requires helicopter air ambulance flights with medical personnel on board to be conducted under Part 135 (Section 135.1, 135.601).
  • Requires certificate holders with 10 or more helicopter air ambulances to establish operations control centers (OCC) (Section 135.619) and requires drug and alcohol testing for operations control specialists (Section 120.105 and 120.215).
  • Requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with HTAWS (Section 135.605).
  • Requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with a flight data monitoring system (Section 135.607).
  • Requires each helicopter air ambulance operator to establish and document, in its operations manual, an FAA-approved preflight risk analysis (Section 135.617).
  • Requires pilots to identify and document the highest obstacle along the planned route (Section 135.615).
  • Requires safety briefings or training for helicopter air ambulance medical personnel (Section 135.621).
  • Establishes visual flight rules (VFR) weather minimums for helicopter air ambulance operations (Section 135.609).
  • Permits instrument flight rules (IFR) operations at airports without weather reporting (Section 135.611).
  • Establishes procedures for transitioning between IFR and VFR on approach to, and departure from, heliports or landing areas (Section 135.613).
  • Requires pilots in commend to hold an instrument rating (Section 135.603).

What is a Fatigue Risk Management System, really?

Source:

Sextant Readings Solutions Jeppesen logo high resFatigue Risk Management tools that make a difference.

What is a Fatigue Risk Management System, really?

The two volumes of ICAO FRM guidance material are quite comprehensive documents of some 150 pages each. Some safety professionals find it difficult to fully embrace the concept of FRMS after reading them. For this reason we at Jeppesen have produced a one-page concise simplification you might find useful. Please find it through this link. Enjoy!

Jeppesen FRMS Poster

Finnair Makes Fatigue Risk Visible in Day of Operation

Source:

Sextant Readings Solutions Jeppesen logo high resFatigue Risk Management tools that make a difference.

Finnair Makes Fatigue Risk Visible in Day of Operation

A few years ago, Finnair became the first airline to plan their pilots with direct influence by a mathematical fatigue model during crew schedule construction. In recent months the airline has expanded its usage to also include fatigue “alerts” that are automatically pushed to the planners in day of operation.

Finnair is using the alert monitor, a feature of Jeppesen Crew Tracking. The alert monitor re-evaluates the entire operation every few seconds and flag potential crew problems to the planner such as late check-ins, too short connection times, breach of maximum duty time etc.

The alert monitor has been in use at Finnair for several years, but it has until now only been used to resolve issues around operational feasibility and regulatory compliance. Now, supporting a performance-based approach, the human physiology is taken into account through the use of the Boeing Alertness Model – allowing for a more precise address of flight safety.

Jan Ahonen Crew Tracking SpecialistJari Ahonen, Crew Tracking Specialist, Finnair, showing fatigue alerts in the system

“The alert monitor is our main tool for not missing out taking action where needed,” says Jari Ahonen at Finnair.  “Fatigue alerts are now present as a new category in the monitor enabling us to put extra attention to problematic scheduling patterns – going beyond what regulation requires. Also during problem resolution, when recombining flights for our crew, we have fatigue indicators available in our planning GUI and can take that into account.”

 

Sextant Readings Presentation on SlideShare has been viewed over 1,750 times

The Sextant Readings presentation – 8 Steps to an Efficient SMS – has been viewed over 1750 times on SlideShare.

Positioning the “8 steps to an efficient SMS” is intended to clarify some of the mis-information about Safety Management that is rife on the internet.  There is a lot of hype about SMS – usually focused on the particular strengths of a vendor’s offering.

However we view Safety Management in the context that safety is a direct result of  “A management system based on professionalism and safety principles” of an organization.  There are many ‘pieces’ of management system support in the offerings from so-called Safety Professionals.

At Sextant Readings we believe that supporting the management of an organization based on the principles of professionalism and safety is our business.  You can see the presentation here:


Aviation Fatigue Risk Management integration with Jeppesen CrewAlert

FRMS Integration

Fatigue has been cited as a contributing factor in aviation accidents. Therefore, a robust Safety Management System (SMS) must take fatigue into account. Capturing and analyzing data within the SMS provides tangible evidence to both airlines and pilots on the effect of fatigue.

An effective Fatigue Risk Management System (FRMS) will rely on a culture that encourages reporting of observed hazards during operations. Under this culture, the pilot will be comfortable feeding back information on their performance during a flight. The analysis of the data captured provides information to the airline operations department, allowing them to proactively manage the impact of fatigue and adjust their recommendations for flying hours and rest times. This analytical, proactive approach to fatigue risk management builds on the same principles as those applied to SMS.

Ideagen Gael have partnered with Jeppesen, (Press release) a unit of Boeing Flight Services, to provide airlines with a new automated solution to report crew fatigue. CrewAlert, an iPhone application built on the Boeing Alertness Model (BAM), has been designed to help airlines and their crews manage alertness and fatigue. Through the partnership, CrewAlert is able to automatically submit crew fatigue reports directly into Ideagen Gael’s Q-Pulse product. This co-ordination allows airlines to create safety reports that aid root cause analysis when working to reduce crew fatigue