ACSF Safety Symposium 2016

ACSF 2016 Safety SymposiumACSF Safety Symposium 2016

Register now for the 2016 Air Charter Safety Foundation Safety Symposium at the NTSB Training Center in Dulles, VA. The event takes place March 8-9, 2016. Don’t miss out!

The event will explore Safety as A Smart Investment for a Rich Future:

  • Maximizing Safety Bang for the Buck–Lessons Learned from NASA

Charlie Justiz, Ph.D., Managing Director, JFA Inc.

  • Standardization–Why Bother?

Dann Runik, Executive Director, Advanced Training Programs, FlightSafety International

  • System Safety

Curt Lewis, President, Curt Lewis & Associates

  • Reducing Risk

Chairman Chris Hart, NTSB Board Member

  • Safety Metrics

Troy Smith, Special Agent, U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation

  • And Much More

Call Bryan Burns at (202) 774-1515.

Onsite registration is available.

Registration Includes

Admittance to the ACSF Symposium both days, all scheduled group meals, breaks, and social functions, and transportation to and from hotel to symposium events.

Member Fee: $625

Nonmember Fee: $795

Online registration requires immediate payment by credit card.

Substitutions are permitted at any time.

Visit www.acsf.aero/symposium for more information and to register online today!

The Magnitude of Change

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The Magnitude of Change

November 12th, 2014

A lot has been written lately on the weaknesses of many change-management strategies and why many change projects fail.  One simple guideline that can avoid many of these problems is simply to make the change in easy steps and to manage the perception of the magnitude of change.

Fact is, too much change too fast overloads people and systems.  Overload causes inefficiencies and other problems all of which demotivate the change effort and the people involved. This does not mean that massive changes are impossible, it simply means that the change has to be divided into bite-sized pieces.  Each piece has to be palatable and not prompt the overload mentality.

So if you want to change your culture or employee behavior or perceptions, pick out a few and give them the old “sell it to yourself first” test.  If thinking about the bite makes you nervous or fearful, take a few items off the list till it seems easy to do.  People don’t inherently resist change as much as they resist force and overload.  All change strategies should mapped and each step should be relatively easy to do and not create negative emotions. How effective are your change strategies?

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.

Civil Aviation Authority Safety Review for Offshore Rotor Operations

In September 2013, following a number of incidents involving offshore helicopter operations, the UK CAA, in conjunction with EASA and the Norwegian Civil Aviation Authority, conducted a safety review. The review examined the risks and hazards of operating in the North Sea and considered how these could be managed more effectively.

This comprehensive analysis of North Sea helicopter operations and safety performance proposes a series of actions and makes a number of important recommendations for the industry. The focus is now on managing the changes arising from the report in a considered and systematic way.

Although focused on oil and gas operations in the North Sea, the Review has indirect relevance for offshore Search and Rescue (SAR) too and will arguably be of interest to other offshore oil and gas locations around the world.

The Review contains 32 Actions which the UK CAA have committed to but more widely 29 Recommendations. Of these, 13 are to EASA, 12 to the Helicopter Industry (AOC Holders, MROs, ATOs and manufacturers), 3 to the oil and gas industry and one collectively to all three of these

Read the full report

FAA Issues EMS Rule, Includes Additional Helicopter Operations

Source: Rotor News, Helicopter Association International (HAI) Feb 21 2014

 

FAA Issues EMS Rule, Includes Additional Helicopter Operations

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has finalized a rule requiring stronger safety measures for helicopter operators, including air ambulances. Changes include equipment, training and operational requirements, and all HAI members are strongly encouraged to review the rule.

The rule is primarily directed toward air ambulance operations, but also addresses commercial helicopter and general aviation helicopter operations, implementing new operational procedures and additional equipment requirements. Additionally, the rule revises requirements for equipment, pilot testing, and alternative airports as well as increasing weather minimums for all general aviation helicopter operations under Part 91 in Class G airspace.

For helicopter air ambulances, the rule requires operations with medical personnel on board to be conducted under Part 135 operating rules and introduces new weather minimums and visibility requirements for Part 135 operations. It mandates flight planning, preflight risk analyses, safety briefings for medical personnel, and the establishment of operations control centers (OCC) for certain operators to help with risk management and flight monitoring. The rule also includes provisions to encourage instrument flight rules (IFR) operations. It requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with both helicopter terrain awareness and warning systems. In addition, helicopter air ambulance pilots will be required to hold instrument ratings.

For all helicopters operated under Part 135, these rules require that operators carry more survival equipment for operations over water. Alternate airports named in flight plans must have higher weather minimums than are currently required. These helicopters must be equipped with radio altimeters and pilots must be able to demonstrate that they can maneuver the aircraft during an inadvertent encounter with instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) to get out of those conditions safely. As mentioned above, the rule assigns new weather minimums to part 91 helicopter operations in Class G airspace.

The following represents a summary of affected entities:

Part 135 All Rotorcraft Operators:
Requires each rotorcraft to be equipped with a radio altimeter ( Section 135.160)
Adds Section 135.168 equipment requirements for rotorcraft operated over water. Helicopter operations conducted over water will be required to carry additional safety equipment to assist passengers and crew in the event an accident occurs over water.

Revised alternate airport weather minimums for rotorcraft in Section 135.221. This rule improves the likelihood of being able to land at the alternate airport if weather conditions in the area deteriorate while the helicopter is en route.

Revises Section 135.293 to require pilot testing of rotorcraft handling in flat-light, whiteout, and brownout conditions and demonstration of competency in recovery from an IIMC.

Part 135 Helicopter Air Ambulance:
Requires helicopter air ambulance flights with medical personnel on board to be conducted under Part 135 (Section 135.1, 135.601).

Requires certificate holders with 10 or more helicopter air ambulances to establish operations control centers (OCC) (Section 135.619) and requires drug and alcohol testing for operations control specialists (Section 120.105 and 120.215).

Requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with HTAWS (Section 135.605).

Requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with a flight data monitoring system (Section 135.607).

Requires each helicopter air ambulance operator to establish and document, in its operations manual, an FAA-approved preflight risk analysis (Section 135.617).

Requires pilots to identify and document the highest obstacle along the planned route (Section 135.615).

Requires safety briefings or training for helicopter air ambulance medical personnel (Section 135.621).

Establishes visual flight rules (VFR) weather minimums for helicopter air ambulance operations (Section 135.609).

Permits instrument flight rules (IFR) operations at airports without weather reporting (Section 135.611).

Establishes procedures for transitioning between IFR and VFR on approach to, and departure from, heliports or landing areas (Section 135.613).

Requires pilots in commend to hold an instrument rating (Section 135.603).

The rule is primarily directed toward air ambulance operations, but also addresses commercial helicopter and general aviation helicopter operations, implementing new operational procedures and additional equipment requirements. Additionally, the rule revises requirements for equipment, pilot testing, and alternative airports as well as increasing weather minimums for all general aviation helicopter operations under Part 91 in Class G airspace.

For helicopter air ambulances, the rule requires operations with medical personnel on board to be conducted under Part 135 operating rules and introduces new weather minimums and visibility requirements for Part 135 operations. It mandates flight planning, preflight risk analyses, safety briefings for medical personnel, and the establishment of operations control centers (OCC) for certain operators to help with risk management and flight monitoring. The rule also includes provisions to encourage instrument flight rules (IFR) operations. It requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with both helicopter terrain awareness and warning systems. In addition, helicopter air ambulance pilots will be required to hold instrument ratings.

For all helicopters operated under Part 135, these rules require that operators carry more survival equipment for operations over water. Alternate airports named in flight plans must have higher weather minimums than are currently required. These helicopters must be equipped with radio altimeters and pilots must be able to demonstrate that they can maneuver the aircraft during an inadvertent encounter with instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) to get out of those conditions safely. As mentioned above, the rule assigns new weather minimums to part 91 helicopter operations in Class G airspace.

The following represents a summary of affected entities:

  • Part 135 All Rotorcraft Operators:
    Requires each rotorcraft to be equipped with a radio altimeter ( Section 135.160)
    Adds Section 135.168 equipment requirements for rotorcraft operated over water. Helicopter operations conducted over water will be required to carry additional safety equipment to assist passengers and crew in the event an accident occurs over water.
  • Revised alternate airport weather minimums for rotorcraft in Section 135.221. This rule improves the likelihood of being able to land at the alternate airport if weather conditions in the area deteriorate while the helicopter is en route.
  • Revises Section 135.293 to require pilot testing of rotorcraft handling in flat-light, whiteout, and brownout conditions and demonstration of competency in recovery from an IIMC.
  • Part 135 Helicopter Air Ambulance:
    Requires helicopter air ambulance flights with medical personnel on board to be conducted under Part 135 (Section 135.1, 135.601).
  • Requires certificate holders with 10 or more helicopter air ambulances to establish operations control centers (OCC) (Section 135.619) and requires drug and alcohol testing for operations control specialists (Section 120.105 and 120.215).
  • Requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with HTAWS (Section 135.605).
  • Requires helicopter air ambulances to be equipped with a flight data monitoring system (Section 135.607).
  • Requires each helicopter air ambulance operator to establish and document, in its operations manual, an FAA-approved preflight risk analysis (Section 135.617).
  • Requires pilots to identify and document the highest obstacle along the planned route (Section 135.615).
  • Requires safety briefings or training for helicopter air ambulance medical personnel (Section 135.621).
  • Establishes visual flight rules (VFR) weather minimums for helicopter air ambulance operations (Section 135.609).
  • Permits instrument flight rules (IFR) operations at airports without weather reporting (Section 135.611).
  • Establishes procedures for transitioning between IFR and VFR on approach to, and departure from, heliports or landing areas (Section 135.613).
  • Requires pilots in commend to hold an instrument rating (Section 135.603).

Dassault to expand Little Rock completion centre

By:   Dave Majumdar Washington DC

12:00 3 Jun 2013 Source:FLIGHT

Dassault is planning to expand its completion center in Little Rock, Arkansas, in anticipation of the company’s new Falcon SMS business jet, which will be unveiled later this year.

“Our next step in the Falcon family is an airplane – the code name is SMS – and that’s really why we needed to extend our presence here,” says John Rosanvallon, president and chief executive of Dassault‘s Falcon Jet division. “This brand new Falcon will be introduced at the next NBAA [National Business Aviation Association] convention in Las Vegas [Nevada] in October and we believe it will be the best Falcon yet.”

Over the next three years, Rosanvallon says Dassault will invest $60 million in new construction and the refurbishment of its existing facilities in Little Rock.

The construction will add 250,000 sq ft (23,225 sq m) to the factory’s 1 million sq ft of floor space. The project will also include refurbishments of the cabinet, upholstery and headliner shops and upgrades to older hangars.

Site preparation for the work will start in early 2014 and construction will be undertaken through the early part of 2016.

 

Sextant Readings Solutions – aviation professionals with a focus on Safety and Risk Management, Quality Management and Quality Assurance, and Compliance for the Aviation Industry.  Sextant Readings Solutions is an IS-BAO Support Services Affiliate, IS-BAO safety consultant, and Auditor.  Ideagen Gael Limited recognizes Sextant Readings Solutions as the authorized re-seller of Q-Pulse®, Ideagen Gael Risk® and MindGenius® for aviation for the Americas.

Aviation SMS and FOQA Integration

Sextant Readings recognizes that within the aviation industry there are many IT suppliers that provide systems to manage the day to day running of the organization. While Sextant Readings specializes in compliance, safety and quality software, there are also other IT suppliers that have synergies to allow Q-Pulse to effectively manage the data integrated from these systems to manage both quality and safety. Through integration, Sextant Readings’s approach is to create a holistic view of safety and in turn allow the organization to have a full understanding of areas of concern which can be identified for improvement.

FOQA integration is an extension of Q-Pulse that provides a two-way interface between Flight Operational Quality Assurance (FOQA) analysis through Flight Data Monitoring (FDM) solutions and the Safety Management System (SMS), which in turn streamlines the incident investigation process. Flight safety data can be centralized and at the same time improve visibility and accessibility throughout an organization.

Q-Pulse FOQA Integration encourages the reporting and subsequent investigation of events where operational parameters have been exceeded. Through the incidents being reported and investigated, corrective or preventative action can be taken to mitigate risks and in turn improve safety levels.

The FOQA data is instantly accessible from the SMS, allowing quick access to events related to an investigation, which in turn saves time and promotes corrective actions to be implemented more quickly.

Q-Pulse FDM Integration allows full analysis of related incidents and in turn can provide a review of associated incidents and enable the identification of trends, leading to improved safety levels and increased efficiency performance.
Ideagen Gael is partnered with three major FOQA solution suppliers:

  • Aerobytes
  • Flight Data Services
  • Sagem

Ideagen Gael is constantly working with other vendors to increase the scope of Q-Pulse FOQA Integration.

The objectives of FOQA Integration are to:

  • Encourage reporting and investigation of events where operational parameters have been exceeded
  • Improve safety levels and mitigate risk
  • Improve efficiency in the process of safety management
  • Identify trends for analysis and identify changes in processes and procedures where necessary

Key Components of a Risk Management System

Sextant Readings Solutions - Risk Key Components

Key Components of a Risk Management System

Risk management requires organization support, an assurance framework and the ability to manage a collection of risks and opportunities. An organization that is successful in implementing an effective risk management system will recognize that there is an upside and a downside to risk.

In order to benefit from a robust risk management system, there are five key components that an organization is required to implement. It should:

  • Ensure executive management support and understanding
  • Consider risk in objective setting and decision making
  • Make the management system transparent, inclusive and accessible to all
  • Continually sense change and respond accordingly
  • Ensure that engagement is systematic, timely and sustainable

The Challenges

Ensuring these five key components comes with its own challenges.

Organizations face the challenge of ensuring that the terminology and methodologies are widely understood and consistently applied. All risk must be systematically evaluated, assessed and managed effectively and risk management and understanding must be widely adopted in all disciplines across the organization.

Risk management is an on-going process, and organizations must be ever ready for scrutiny and able to stand up to audit, as well as to ensure that learning from every incident is shared.

The Pitfalls

For effective risk management, organizations must avoid storing information in disconnected systems, formats and locations and make sure that change is managed and communicated effectively. Organizations are also open to exposure from actions that are not assigned or completed while time intensive and error prone reporting processes could be harmful, or even fatal, to the business

Learn about Ideagen Gael’s Risk Management Solutions

Sextant Readings Solutions - Ideagen Gael Risk Management Solutions

Learn more about Ideagen Gael’s Risk Management solutions

To help you understand the challenges and pains around risk management, we provide a number of resources that you can read and view at your convenience.

Have a look at our Success Story to see how we achieved ISO 27001 certification using only our own products and you can also view our Recorded Webinars collection, which cover best practice and ideas for improvement.

You can also learn more about the Bowtie methodology – the visual diagram inherent in the Ideagen Gael Risk product – from the side banner.

Professional Services

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Risk Implementation Professional Services

Establishing risk management processes and a risk culture within your organization helps to create greater resilience. Strong risk management processes and understanding helps your organization capitalize on opportunity, drive business success through delivering objectives and, in doing so, increase stakeholder value.

Our professional services can help deliver successful risk management. Through our consultants and our global partner network, our consultancy ranges in scope from simply providing a software solution through to full facilitation and project management to deliver robust risk management across an organization. We will jointly assess how effective your organization’s current risk management processes are – as well as the level of understanding of risk management within your business. You, working with our team, can determine the status of your risk management, how effective your processes currently are and highlight areas of improvement that we can help with.

Over the last 20 years, our professional services organization has delivered many projects, and our global partner network is professionally trained to provide exceptional levels of customer service and support. This ensures we are well placed to offer international customers a level of service that is second to none.

Our consultants and partner network will be as active in your project delivery as you determine – which could simply be staged progress reviews through to a complete project management and successful conclusion. Initial and strategic reviews with our professional services organization helps to determine the scope of your risk management project, entering consultation to gauge your current risk management situation and reviewing your current level of understanding and consistency to provide a clear picture of what can be achieved. Deliverables and key milestones are identified and highlighted, taking into account resources and constraints along the way.

Q-Pulse Integration

Sextant Readings Solutions - Solutions

Q-Pulse Integration

Ideagen Gael Risk’s ability to integrate with Q-Pulse enables operational data held across the organization to be directly associated with:

  • Building confidence in the knowledge that your risk management system is effective.
  • Providing early warning indicators based on your risk management requirements and making the right preventive decisions before it is too late.
  • Linking Ideagen Gael Risk to Q-Pulse documents, assets, incidents and non-conformances to provide the information you need to assess your system.
  • Linking Ideagen Gael Risk to other operational systems that mitigate risk in your organization.

For example, when reviewing a risk control linked to a Q-Pulse procedure, Ideagen Gael Risk provides you with a summary that highlights key information such as:

  • Number of non-conformances
  • Last review date
  • Last audit date
  • How often updated
  • Number of people trained on this procedure

Sextant Readings Solutions - Integration with Docs

This is key information that is vital to support any type of review.

Ideagen Gael Risk is an integrated solution providing comprehensive risk assessment, treatment and management across the whole organization.